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question, how to build a stalingrad.
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question, how to build a stalingrad. 4 years, 12 months ago #27102

  • howardjd
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In 2006 on April 1st an article was published about a wheel set that weighed in at around 45pounds per wheel made of cast iron. velonews.competitor.com/2006/04/bikes-an...from-steve-hed_9673.
Being highly interested in the effect of wheel inertia on cycling performance this really caught my eye. I certainly would love to have a pair only problem is that this was an Aprils fools joke.
The question is what are the engineering challenges for creating such wheel. With say a 1000dollar budget and the labor of some type of metal worker would it be fessible to be able to create such a monstrasity?
I have emailed Hed about how much it would cost to actually have one made but got no response.
I certainly would love to time trial them vrs some more normal wheels on a flat course.

just for laughs I actually got fooled by this when someone posted it on another forum when I was discussing wheel inertia, I was so excited was actually considering buying them until someone informed me about the date on the article.

Re: question, how to build a stalingrad. 4 years, 11 months ago #27103

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I've been thinking about this alot latley and have come up with a method that may be possible altough it would look different then the photo in the article.

First eliminate the problem of making the rim by just starting with a steel rim
then cut circular pieces of iron or steel from a flat sheet to the size the steel rim will slide over it, if the thickness of the pieces is to thin weld two together.
then weld the rim to the pieces of metal
then find a hollow metal cylinder just big enough so a bike hub can slide into it, then cut the cylinder so its just as long as the distance between the two ridges spokes are normaly attached to.
then cut a hole in the center of the circles so that the cylinder can just slide into it, then wield the cylinder to the ciruclar plate
then cut out sections of the front wheel up leaving behind "spokes" and a deep section rim
I'll be going to a metal shop to have something machined soon, I'll certainly have to ask them what they think about this plan.

If they are ever created mabye I'll call them "Rampager Heavy Elites"
Last Edit: 4 years, 11 months ago by howardjd. Reason: spelling error

Re: question, how to build a stalingrad. 4 years, 11 months ago #27104

  • SteveI
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A really heavy rear wheel could prove quite popular as a turbo wheel!

Re: question, how to build a stalingrad. 4 years, 11 months ago #27105

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Yeah I would be really interested to see how they sprinted with a flying start. I was thinking (If and when they are created) that I would run a 27mm tire on the rear and 25mm on the front each tire choosen for having the highest rating for psi. They would then be inflated to max pressure to eliminate as much excess rolling resistance as possible. In theory you should only see a loss from rolling resistance and accelerations. But it also would deccelerate much slower.

whats a turbowheel? by the way. I'm guessing something to do with automotive racing.

Re: question, how to build a stalingrad. 4 years, 11 months ago #27106

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Turbo wheel = wheel that you swap onto the bike to use on a turbo trainer. Turbo trainers suffer from a lack of inertia compared to riding on the road, so a very heavy rear wheel could correct that.

Re: question, how to build a stalingrad. 4 years, 11 months ago #27107

  • wasfast
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Not exactly on point to the original question but Ondrej Sosenka broke the world hour record in 2005 using a 3.2kg rear wheel:

"In his attempt, Sosenka was using a 3.2 kg wheel and 190 mm cranks, with his bike weighing a total of 9.8 kg. The reason for the heavy wheel was that although it was harder to get up to speed, it was easy to maintain it."

www.cyclingnews.com/news/hour-record-bro...by-sosenka-in-moscow

How much of the record was due to doping vs the wheel we'll never know. He was suspended for doping later:

www.cyclingnews.com/news/world-hour-reco...-positive-for-doping


In any case, the discussion about the plusses/minuses of "flywheel effect" are interesting. It would seem there's a intersecting curve plot of wheel weight (mass) vs accelleration/basic functionality.

Re: question, how to build a stalingrad. 4 years, 11 months ago #27108

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Yeah hearing/reading about sosenka's wheel and mosers huge wheel got me interested into wheel inertia and cycling performance. I have a 7 pound and 12 pound disk made beacuase of this. They both ride awesome, took the 12pounder(the Air Hammer) out on a windy day about a week ago and it performed great. The thing rode quite stable through cross winds.
Building the really heavy wheels is really just for the fun out it. I spent some time discussing the engineering challenges of making the wheel with my bike mechanic recently and we've come up with a pretty good plan. I'd love to make them as soon as possible but because of the expense I might have to wait until I'm out of school and have a paying job.
Last Edit: 4 years, 11 months ago by howardjd.
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